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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Effects of small watershed development on land values found in the catalog.

Effects of small watershed development on land values

James Kasal

Effects of small watershed development on land values

by James Kasal

  • 98 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Real property -- Valuation -- United States,
  • Watersheds -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    Issued May 1978

    StatementJames Kasal
    SeriesAgricultural economic report ; no. 404, Agricultural economic report -- no. 404
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 36 p. ;
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14837042M

    A land value tax or location value tax (LVT), also called a site valuation tax, split rate tax, or site-value rating, is an ad valorem levy on the unimproved value of property taxes, it disregards the value of buildings, personal property and other improvements to real estate. A land value tax is generally favored by economists as (unlike other taxes) it does not cause economic. Tiegang Zhang's 6 research works with 25 citations and reads, including: Spatial Distribution Characteristics and Pollution Evaluation of Soil Iron in the Middle Hanjiang River.

    At first glance, the term watershed management appears to be self-explanatory, its meaning apparent in its very wording. Watershed management is the managing of a watershed. At best, however, this definition is merely the starting point and might appropriately be compared to the initial upland flow of a watershed itself, before becoming part of a complex system covering a broad area. Variously.   The effect of wetlands and other physical and locational characteristics on the prices of rural land can be estimated. Location, parcel size, capital improvements, proportion of land in intensive uses, and land area in wetlands explained more than 80% of the variation in property sale prices.

    Small Changes, Big Difference. Remember, the concept of cumulative effects is particularly relevant to stewardship; small changes, when combined, can make a big difference. Here are a few more basic stewardship principles that can help landowners and land mangers become better stewards and make more sustainable use of the resources in their care. The threat of erosion also exists. Water flowing to a stream picks up dirt along the way. If the water picks up enough soil over time, the land along that stream will become unstable and eventually erode away. If you live along a river bank, this could mean losing your backyard. For wildlife that lives in this area, it means a loss of their.


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Effects of small watershed development on land values by James Kasal Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Effects of small watershed development on land values. [James Kasal; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service.].

This study attempts to determine the effects of small watershed resource development on land values. Specifically, the study (1) estimates net land value changes in the immediate vicinity of small watershed reservoirs; (2) ana- lyzes the major factors affecting the magnitude of land value changes; and (3) estimates the real cost of land easements.

The aims of this paper are therefore (a) to assess the land use and cover change that occurred between andand between and ; and (b) to assess the effects of the watershed management on curbing land degradation and improving agricultural production.

Materials and methods Site descriptionCited by: The Watershed Perspective Each type of land use has a varying effect on the hydrologic cycle, thereby affecting the people and the natural resources on a landscape.A watershed perspective can be used to scientifically study the effect of land uses on water and downstream ecosystems.A watershed is defined as a topographically delineated area drained by a stream system; that is, the total land.

minor effect on property values, with small increases (8%) in sold prices for flooded areas (perhaps due to the value added by repairs and renovation) and small decreases (-7%) for non-flooded areas.

Wind energy has paid off for rural areas. Whether it be new employment opportunities, additional revenue for counties, or direct payments to landowners, rural communities have received significant benefits.

However, any kind of new development comes with concerns. One frequent concern voiced by local residents is what effect a wind farm may have on property values.

recently developed method of land rehabilitation and climate change adaptation (Darghouth and others ). Watershed development planning in Ethiopia was started in the ’s.

Since then the government, nongovernmental organizations and local community efforts on rural development have been based on watershed development program.

effect of lowering aggregate land values in the communities doing the zoning. Most proponents of zoning claim that zoning “protects land values,” and many decision-makers in the zoning field apparently believe that their actions lead to maximization of land values.

While land values are undoubtedly an. • Include all stakeholders in watershed management rather than only the poor farmers in the target areas, as is the current practice among most development organisations. • Select preventive rather than curative activities, and base them on land use capacity and income generating potential for maximum cost-effectiveness.

Judicious land use by users is of vital importance to watershed management and functioning. Change of land use within the watershed, especially within the variable source area, greatly affects the collection capacity and consequent runoff behavior of the watershed.

The extent of land use change over the watershed has effects that are similar to. distance of a parcel of land to the nearest Metro station and land price (Damm, Lerner-Lam, and Young, ), while there was evidence that residential property prices decrease immediately around the transport investment or station value uplift through changes in land values (Singh, ).

for restoring small urban watersheds. The entire series of manuals was written to organize the enormous amount of information needed to restore small urban watersheds in a format that watershed groups, municipal staff, environmental consultants, and other users can ac-cess easily.

Factors affecting Land Value mainly include the following: 1. Physical attributes: These include quality of location, topography, climate, availability of water, sewer lines, etc. More and better facilities are attributed to a higher price of land. Topography further has a direct effect on the construction cost and thus the overall development.

Overview. Watershed degradation is the loss of value over time, including the productive potential of land and water, accompanied by marked changes in the hydrological behaviour of a river system resulting in inferior quality, quantity and timing of waterflow.

The protection, improvement and rehabilitation of mountain and/or upland watersheds are of critical importance in the achievement of. A watershed is an area of land that drains all the streams and rainfall to a common outlet such as the outflow of a reservoir, mouth of a bay, or any point along a stream channel.

Watersheds can be as small as a footprint or large enough to encompass all the land that drains water into rivers that drain into Chesapeake Bay, where it enters the Atlantic Ocean.

Bibliography Background About KRIS Cumulative Watershed Effects. Cumulative effects are "those effects on the environment that result from the incremental effect of the action when added to past, present and reasonably foreseeable future actions regardless of what agency (federal or nonfederal) or person undertakes such other actions.

Increased land values and concentration of development around interchanges. Added lanes, intersections/ Same as above, but to a lesser degree.

the Area of Potential Effects Field Visits, GIS, Questionnaire Surveys, Focus Groups, etc. (may be small or very large) an ecosystem. Urban development mostly has a negative effect on water quality.

Urban development reduces the uptake of water, which causes water in urban areas to collect chemicals and pollutants. This takes the chemical pollutants to larger bodies of water, such as streams or ponds, and damages the water.

The more common a certain type of easement is the less impact it will have on value because buyers have come to know about it and accept it.

To determine if the easement has any type of positive or negative effect on property value it would be necessary to look at what other properties are selling for that do not have the easement. water resource projects were enthusiastically promoted by government leaders in an effort to demonstrate rapid progress toward development.

In the s — s, watershed management in many developing countries focused on restoring land and water systems that had become degraded and protecting earlier water resource development investments.

Real estate values vary from one county to the next. Local economics, the way the land will be used and its features, such as water or a view, all determine land values. An easement might have a significant impact on land in one part of the country and a lesser impact in another.

Rural land might be less affected than urban property. The purpose of the study was to assess land use and land cover changes (LULCC) effects on stream flow of the upper Gidabo Watershed, Ethiopia. The dat. On a much bigger scale, Jaeger et al. () looked at land values associated with Oregon’s land use system, which divides the state into urbanized areas where development is concentrated (inside UGBs, or urban growth boundaries) and rural ones (outside UGBs).

They found that over several decades, undeveloped land values had appreciated at.